To the Woman Who Posted a Picture Laced with Subtle Racism, and Was Upset by the Backlash

 

To the woman who posted a picture laced with subtle racism, and was upset by the backlash:

You posted a picture of yourself beside a figure of Donald Trump, added a cute comment in support of it and threw it out there like bait on a hook, as if wishing to further fuel the fires of the anger at the injustices many of us are currently facing. You knew people would see that photo when you posted it to your thousands of followers. And you must have known that what to you may have been a harmless photo, to others was a blaring reminder, a threat even, that we are still not safe.

So when people shot their anger at you through the keyboards in front of them, slipping past the defenses you had built to keep them out, and into your Twitter notifications you must understand that it was, a reminder that there will always be people to stand against bigotry and a question as to whether or not bigotry will be a timeless monstrosity.

And while it was unkind that they did say things that have hurt your feelings, I do not feel sorry for you, not in the slightest. In fact, I’m very happy for you because if you feel that way I can only assume you must have been born in a position of so much privilege, that you were able to feel okay making light of what for others is a terrifying reality.

But instead of using your privilege to help others who weren’t so fortunate, after receiving those reminders you chose to further comment on how much lesser than you they were, letting your loyal fans know how these terrible monsters hurt your feelings, inviting in a barrage of kind replies from strangers miles away. Replies that mocked the legitimate fears of real people. Replies that you were none too quick to favorite, because you were so quick to play the victim you forgot to ask who the real villain truly is.

Because while you spent your day making comments about how you felt people should just comply with what’s going on, there were many so similar to you, but who were able to acknowledge the power they had, and so many who maybe weren’t exactly like you with your privileged life, who peacefully protested, who marched through the streets, building bridges  and not walls, on all 7 continents as a gesture of solidarity for those who are marginalized and whose rights and concerns have often been thrown out like yesterday’s trash.

So while you posted what you felt was a harmless picture, what you really posted was an implication of acceptance of his ideologies. What you really posted was a gesture of your support of someone who wishes to take away not only the rights of so many others, but a few of yours as well. Our reaction to this is the reaction I’d hope you’d have had you seen someone else posing fondly with  other white supremacists/ all around bigots for that matter.

For many, the Woman’s March was a reminder that there is still hope to be had, and that there are still millions of people willing to stand for what’s right, that there are still people willing to stand up for people like them.

Because, while you may be lucky enough to never feel the side effects of voting for a callous, volatile, egotist, bigot, there are people who will wake up tomorrow who will. There will be people who will wake up tomorrow who will still be queer, who will still be black, who will still be Muslim, who will still be a part of a marginalized group.

And sadly, unlike you, they will have to face worse threats than some mean words typed from a keyboard miles  away.

 


 

Kai is a  mixed race writer from Vancouver. When Kai isn’t writing  she spends her time singing loudly, dancing badly and being an all around nuisance.

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